Tag Archives: rabbi

Rabbi Uri Weinberg A”H (Uri Ben Menachem Halevi) [18 May 1923 – 17 Adar 5772 (11 March 2012)]

Please share with the rest of us your memories (add a new comment below this post or send me an e-mail)

Please pledge to learn a Mishna in the memory of the Mes Mitzva and Tzaddik Uri Ben Menachem Halevi.a

On Sunday 11 March 2012 I received a message that Rabbi Uri Weinberg a”h (Uri Ben Menachem Halevi), or as he was known Reb Uri, passed a way in Yerushalayim after a massive heart attack in his home which was in the Batei Ungarin.

I met him for the first time in about 2000 when my brother introduced me to him. The first time I saw him, I never imagined that the man standing in front of me with his trademarked gray jacket was no simple man; he was a Continue reading Rabbi Uri Weinberg A”H (Uri Ben Menachem Halevi) [18 May 1923 – 17 Adar 5772 (11 March 2012)]

Do you call that fair?

A man approached the rabbi and complained about the poor economic situation of the town:

“There is one thing that depresses me,” sighed the man, “and that is the injustice accorded to the poor. The rich who have more money than they need can buy on credit. But the poor, who haven’t two coins to rub together, have to pay cash for everything. Do you call that fair?”
“I admire your ideals for nature,” said the rabbi, “but a merchant who extends credit for the poor instead of the rich will soon become a poor man himself.”
“So what?” retorted the man, “Then he’ll be able to buy on credit, too!”

HebrewBooks.org

One of the greatest projects for genealogists on the Internet and which are managed by different organizations, are websites with complete digitized books.

One of these projects which can be interesting for Jewish family researchers, is http://hebrewbooks.org.

Their mission as stated on their site:

Hebrewbooks.org was founded in order to preserve old American Hebrew books that are out of print and/or circulation. Many American Rabbis wrote seforim (Hebrew books) in the early part of the 20th century. They have long since passed away and in many instances so has their holy work.
Currently our mission has expanded to include all Torah Seforim ever printed. At Hebrewbooks.org you will be able to view and print the entire Sefer online.
[…]
HebrewBooks.org is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Our goal is to bring to life the many Seforim that were written and unfortunately forgotten, and to make all Torah Publications free and ubiquitous.

I uploaded here on my website as an example a few Continue reading HebrewBooks.org

Jewish Law – a TV series filmed in the Manchester Orthodox Community

I came recently across a series which about Jewish Orthodox religion. I’m not sure when the series were filmed, but I’d like to know.
There are three episodes for you to watch. Have fun!

Content:
Episode 1
An explanation of Jewish culture begins with kosher cooking. Why are there two sinks and two fridges in all Jewish kitchens? What makes food kosher?
Jewish Law: Episode 1 (Part 1 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 1 (Part 2 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 1 (Part 3 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 1 (Part 4 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 1 (Part 5 of 5)

Episode 2
Follow a Manchester rabbi and his family as they prepare for Passover in this insightful exploration of the Jewish faith.
This next installment deals more with Jewish tradition, holidays and practice. How the sabbath is observed, Passover, circumcision, family purity…
Jewish Law: Episode 2 (Part 1 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 2 (Part 2 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 2 (Part 3 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 2 (Part 4 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 2 (Part 5 of 5)

Episode 3
This part concludes the series and deals with more areas of Jewish practice, such as the festival of Purim, niddah, mourning…
Jewish Law: Episode 3 (Part 1 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 3 (Part 2 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 3 (Part 3 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 3 (Part 4 of 5)
Jewish Law: Episode 3 (Part 5 of 5)


An explanation of Jewish culture begins with kosher cooking. Why are there two sinks and two fridges in all Jewish kitchens? What makes food kosher?


Continue reading Jewish Law – a TV series filmed in the Manchester Orthodox Community